War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0531 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

filades a little ravine between him and the enemy. The important assault was made at the hour ordered-4.30 a. m. General Barlow and General Gibbon are now trying to plant batteries, for which unfortunately we have no good positions, in order to prevent this enfilading fire. If the guns on the left can be silenced, General Barlow will reassault, and I have directed General Gibbon to let me know what he requires additional to do the same. Our troops hold advanced ground-only awaiting the decision of the question whether any additional assaults are wise. I will let you know soon what is my judgment. I consider that the assault failed long since, but I volunteered the statement that we would cling to the advanced positions stained, so that, if any successes were gained by other corps on our right, we would feel ready to try it again, as we would feel that additional chances had arisen. Now if these batteries referred to on my right or left, or both, can be silenced, we will assault again.

Your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 3, 1864-8.45 a. m. (Received 9 a. m.)

Major-General HANCOCK:

I send you two notes* from Wright, who thinks he can carry the enemy's main line if he is relieved by attacks of the Second and Eighteenth Corps; also, that he is under the impression he is in advance of you. It is of the greatest importance no effort should be spared to succeed. Wright and Smith are both going to try again, and unless you consider it hopeless I would like you do the same.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS, June 3, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

GENERAL: Some of my dispatches cannot have reached. I have assaulted the enemy's line vigorously, broke it in one or two places, and held temporarily four guns and captured several hundred prisoners, and was then driven out. My line retired but a very short distance, and attempts were made to retake the works-thus far without success. General Gibbon is simply making dispositions to hold the ground he had gained, until some orders are received. General Barlow is waiting the same way. An assault can be promptly repeated if desired, but division commanders do not speak encouragingly of the prospect of success since the original attacks failed. Uncles success has been gained in other points, I do not advise persistence here.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

---------------

*See Wright to Humphreys, 7.45 a. m. and 8 a. m., pp. 544, 545.

---------------