War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0527 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 3, 1864-9.25 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Do you think it worth while to do anything about the York River Railroad in the way of bringing locomotives and cars? If the weather continues good we can haul, but if we have rain, and are detained on the Chickahominy, we shall be embarrassed with bad, detestably bad, roads.

Respectfully,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

[Indorsement.]

I think I will not order cars for the York River Railroad just yet. The wagons now at White House will give us supplies to about the 15th, and before that I hope our base will be changed to the James River.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES, June 3, 1864.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: Might not two or more Coehorns be well used in front of Barlow to-night?

Respectfully,

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 3, 1864-8.30 p. m.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding:

GENERAL: The Coehorns have been in position and in use all the afternoon in Hancock's front.

Respectfully,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 3, 1864-9 p. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of the Staff:

GENERAL: The whole number of prisoners received to-day is 287, of whom 14 are officers, viz, from Second Corps, 225; Fifth Corps, 24; Ninth Corps, 38. None are in from General W. F. Smith, who is understood to have some. Their examination shows that to-day Ewell held their left, Longstreet next, Breckinridge next, with a new division of four brigades on their right, and that the greater part of A. P. Hill's corps was in reserve near the right. A rebel