War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0526 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N. C. Chapter XLVIII.

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NEAR COLD HARBOR, June 3, 1864-7 a. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

The moment it becomes certain that an assault cannot succeed, suspend the offensive, but when one does succeed push it vigorously, and if necessary pile in troops at the successful point from wherever they can be taken. I shall go to where you are in the course of an hour.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General .

COLD HARBOR, June 3, 1864-12.30 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

The opinion of corps commanders not being sanguine of success in case an assault is ordered, you may direct a suspension of farther advance for the present. Hold our most advanced positions, and strengthen them. Whilst on the defensive, our line may be contracted from the right if practicable. Reconnaissances should be made in front of every corps, and advances made to advantageous positions by regular approaches. To aid the expedition under General Hunter it is necessary that we should detain all the army now with Lee until the former gets well on his way to Lynchburg. To do this effectually it will be better to keep the enemy out of the entrenchments of Richmond than to have them go back there. Wright and Hancock should be ready to assault in case the enemy should break through General Smith's lines, and all should be ready to resist an assault.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 3, 1864-5.45 p. m.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding:

GENERAL: The telegrams you return were sent from here by me, so that you need not return them. Warren was re-enforced by Birney, and posted him on his left, where he now is, forming connection between Smith and Warren. I have notified Warren there are no other troops to send him, and that he and Burnside must contract their lines to-night. Everything is apparently quiet along the lines. We hold all our advanced positions, and are intrenching. To-nigh Hancock will establish batteries, and we will begin all along the lines, digging up to the enemy's works. I have sent out officers to each of the corps and to the hospitals to endeavor to form some estimate of the casualties to-day.

Respectfully,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.