War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0515 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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rafts and torpedo-boats, I think all questions of delicacy should be waived by the paramount consideration of protection for the lives of the men and the safety of the very valuable vessels of the squadron. Pardon me if I have overstepped any line of duty or courtesy in the latter suggestion.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

JUNE 2, 1864-7 p. m.

Lieutenant-Colonel FULLER:

How long will it take Captain Ainsworth and all the men you can spare to put 60 tons of ballast in each of the obstruction vessels? Answer by telegraph.

B. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

BERMUDA, June 2, 1864.

Major-General BUTLER:

I have had all hands at work during the night digging stones. I have a sufficient amount for three schooners ready. I sent two tangs at 3 o'clock this a. m. up the river after the schooner. They have not yet returned; the admiral must have detained them.

GEO. S. DODGE,

Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

JUNE 2, 1864-10.30 a. m.

Lieutenant-Colonel FULLER:

Have six coils of the telegraph wire at Bermuda Hundred sent to Colonel Ames at Spring Hill at once.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

BERMUDA, June 2, 1864.

Major-General BUTLER:

The tug Van Vliet has gone to Colonel Ames at Spring Hill with six coils of telegraph wire, as ordered.

C. E. FULLER,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Quartermaster.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS, June 2, 1864-7.58 a. m.

General BUTLER,

Commanding:

General Terry's pickets on the right, Ames's old front, have been driven back from their advance rifle-pits. The enemy pierced the line in several places. They still hold the woods. I have ordered re-enforcements and entrenching tools out.

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Major-General.