War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0465 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, THIRD DIV., 9TH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, June 1, 1864-10 a. m.

General WILLCOX,

Commanding Third Division:

GENERAL: The troops of the First Division not moving up on continuance of my line, the line has been taken up by my brigade, so that my left now rests on the Shady Grove road. The skirmish line of the First Division now connects with the left of my main line. I request that the First Division move up and connect its main line with the left of my line, and their skirmish line be advanced on the continuance of mile. I also request that the Second Brigade, Third Division, be moved as support to my line. Our pits and the enemy's are in some places not more than 30 yards apart. The line is a good one.

I am, general, yours, most obediently,

J. F. HARTRANFT,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION,

June 1, 1864-4.05 p. m.

Major-General BURNSIDE:

GENERAL: No particular change so far to-day on my front in the enemy's works. No artillery had opened, and I have sent out scouts to ascertain whether the guns are still in position. Colonel Humphrey reports just now that "a small column of the enemy, perhaps a small brigade, have just passed from Potter's front across toward the left, crossing the farther corner of the field and into the woods beyond." It may be a relief of the picket-line.

Very respectfully, yours,

O. B. WILLCOX,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 1, 1864-8 a. m.

Brigadier-General FERRERO,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: I am directed to inform you that most of the cavalry on our right has been detached for special service, leaving only a thin line of cavalry pickets in that direction. I am, therefore, instructed to say that you will throw your pickets well out on the road leading in from the right, and dispose your forces on the right of the trains so as to afford the best protection against an attack from that quarter. You will also confer frequently with Captain Peirce, the quartermaster in charge of the trains, so that your forces can be most advantageously disposed for the proper protection of the wagons.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

30 R R-VOL XXXVI, PT III