War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0464 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter XLVIII.

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from the picket-line, and reports no change except that [it] joins General Willcox's line on the right. I have a staff officer now on the picket-line, and will report immediately on his return.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding Division.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, NINTH ARMY CORPS,

June 1, 1864-7 a. m.

Lieutenant-Colonel RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: The enemy seem to be about the same on my front as last night. My line is, I think, very good and strong, and one that I can hold against a very superior force. There was noise in the enemy's lines during the night, as of a movement of wagons or artillery to rear and left. I am about firing a few shots from my rifled battery to get the range and try and get the enemy out of a house from which they annoy me a good deal.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT B. POTTER,

Brigadier-General.

Skirmishing is tolerably sharp.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, NINTH ARMY CORPS,

June 1, 1864-2.30 p. m.

Lieutenant-Colonel RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: The skirmishers in my front have been steadily and persistently pressed against the enemy all day, who are, I think, in a position that no line of skirmishers can dislodge them from. My line is very long, three-fourths of my whole force being on it, the remaining fourth being in reserve supporting my batteries, &c. I have no second line. I believe, from the best information I can obtain and from personal inspection, that my line is fully one-half of that of the whole corps, and equal to one-half of the length of the whole line occupied by the Second Corps. A careful examination of the enemy's position in my front is now being made, and a detailed report of the result will be sent in as soon as ascertained. We know, however, that the enemy are in a strong position and seemingly in considerable force in our front. This continual pressing at this point seems to be a waste of force without any result, and a good many men are being lost. I do not think I can advance my line any without making an assault in force, and in that case I should be properly supported.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT B. POTTER,

Brigadier-General.

P. S.- I am obliged to use my artillery to some extent to relieve my skirmishers.