War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0335 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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HDQRS. 3rd Brigadier, 3rd DIV., SECOND ARMY CORPS,

May 30, 1864.

Major F. BIRNEY,

Asst. Adjt. General, Third Division, Second Corps:

MAJOR: In accordance with instructions from headquarters Third Division, I have the honor to report that at 7.25 this p. m. I received orders to attack the enemy without delay. i immediately ordered my pickets to advance, which was promptly done, and prepared the brigade for an attack. Three regiments of my right advanced some 200 yards, the other about 100 yards, when the other to attack was countermanded. When the order to attack was received the brigade was lying in the woods screened from the enemy, with the intention of taking a position or advance at dusk. The position is now taken and the rifle-pits being built. It was impracticable to do it before, as the command would have been exposed to the fire from the enemy's works. My pickets are now advanced and the connection on the right and left are perfected.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. MOTT,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH CORPS,

May 30, 1864 - 4.50 a. m.

General BURNSIDE:

I am directed to take position on your left. Will you please let me know when you are in position?

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.

BURNSIDE'S HEADQUARTERS,

May 30, 1864.

General WARREN:

Your dispatch received. I have just returned from the front and find that General Hancock is posting his command on or near the Hanover Court-House and Cold Harbor road, with two divisions east of the old Richmond road and one west. I mean the road that leads from Harris' [Haw's] Shop to Atlee's. I am to take position on his left, but I do not know yet where my left will be. My troops have started, and the position is being laid out by Major Morton.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

May 30, 1864 - 5 a. m.

General BURNSIDE:

It is my wish that your troops might take up the position occupied by General Griffin, and allow of his being moved farther to the left. So far only one brigade has been thus relieved by General Crittenden. General Griffin may have covered more ground than General Crittenden thinks he can take, but as no enemy was found within a mile