War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0289 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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very near up the river mounts two 28-pounders. One still above mounts one 30-pounder. Garrison of Fort Clifton only 300 men. Field-works extend from Fort Clifton to Swift Creek, along the high ground, with several forts on the line. Much dissatisfaction among the rebels there. Some 50 others wish to desert their regiments. At Fort Clifton they fear these works at Spring Hill, which they say are for the benefit of Fort Clifton. They expect to see the woods on the bank cut and fire to open very soon. The deserters also report two heavy guns (200-pounders) gone down the river on this side, leaving petersburg on the City Point road. One, a sergeant, says he saw the guns, and saw them leave in this direction. They were said to be for the purpose of sinking the gun-boats on the James River. The force in Petersburg they think quite small, but do not rally know. Works south of the city slight. Report all valuables being sent away from Petersburg. All railroads are repaired and hard at work. I will send these men up in the morning. They are very intelligent, one an orderly sergeant.

AMES,

Colonel.

MAY 28, 1864.

(Received 7.40 p. m.)

General HINKS:

You will please look out for General Martindale's command, which will cross the Appomattox and march to City Point to-night. Do not mistake them for the enemy.

WM. F. SMITH,

Major-General.

MAY 28, 1864-10.30 p. m.

Major-General SMITH:

Have reached City Point, and await orders.

J. H. MARTINDALE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

Hanovertown, May 29, 1864. (Received 12.10 p. m. 31st.)

Major-General HALLECK, Washington, D. C.:

The army has been successfully crossed over the Pamunkey and now occupies a front about 3 miles south of the river. Yesterday two divisions of our cavalry had a severe engagement with the enemy south of Haw's Shop, driving him about 1 mile on what appears to be his new line. We will find out all about it to-day. Our loss in the cavalry engagement was 350 killed and wounded, of whom but 44 are ascertained to have been killed. Having driven the enemy, most of their killed and many of their wounded fell into our hands.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

19 R R-VOL XXXVI, PT III