War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0272 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter XLVIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

ground will admit, so as to have a force available for other purposes than the defense of the line of rifle-pits, which should be thrown up immediately upon your occupancy of the ground. Information received from prisoners and others leads to the belief that a large part of Lee's army is already in our front, and the commanding general desires to have the army in position, intrenched, at the earliest possible moment.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

May 28, 1864-11 p. m.

General A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

I have the honor to report that one division of my command is now in camp on the south side of the Pamunkey, and the others are coming in. There was considerable delay caused in getting them across the bridge, in consequence of the cutting of one of the trains of the Fifth Corps just before the column reached the bridge. I think the road is now clear, and I hope to get the last of the command in camp by 1 o'clock. My headquarters are between those of General Warren and the bridge.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. E. BURNSIDE.

ARTILLERY HDQRS., ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 28, 1864.

Captain JOHN EDWARDS,

Commanding Reserve Artillery, Ninth Corps:

CAPTAIN: Your report of yesterday is just received. General Meade directs that you take your command to Washington, either by water, if transportation can be procured at Port Royal, or that you march across the country, via Dumfries. If it is not considered safe for your to march, you will telegraph to Washington for an escort. There is telegraphic communication from Port Conway. You will have to be ferried across at Port Royal. Look out for yourself, and get across the river as soon as you can.

Respectfully, &c.,

HENRY J. HUNT,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery.

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

May 28, 1864.

The order of march to-day will be as follows: First, the wagon train, in charge of sufficient guards to assist them; second, General Willcox's division; third, General Potter's division; fourth, General Crittenden's division. General Crittenden will instruct his rear guards to force up all stragglers. General Willcox will start at 6.30 o'clock, or as soon thereafter as the road is well clear of wagons.