War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0227 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Hancock. After withdrawing you must arrange your corps so as to hold the fords and crossing places from Ox Ford to Jericho Bridge. Perhaps Hancock will be able to hold Ox Ford and leave the upper crossings only to you; of this I will more fully advise you.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

May 26, 1864-10.30 a.m.

Major General GEORGE G. MEADE, Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: Your dispatch is received and will receive attention.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

May 26, 1864-10.30 a.m.

Colonel WILSON,

Chief Commissary, Army of the Potomac:

With the supplies issued this morning this corps is rationed to the morning of the 31st with bread, sugar, coffee, and salt, and some seven or eight days' fresh beef. We have no more rations at Milford at this time, and unless you have a general supply train there to issue from, I shall direct that the small rations now on hand be made to last until the morning of the 2nd, and will issue an extra amount of beef, if necessary. Have you a general supply train at Milford?

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 26, 1864.

Major-General BURNSIDE,

Commanding Ninth Army Corps:

No extra transportation is furnished this army for subsistence stores beyond what the corps have. We have had always to depend upon sending the wagons back to the depot for supplies as soon as they are emptied, and this into be done with these wagons which to-day are issued from to bring the supplies up to June 1. Colonel Goodrich informed me yesterday that these wagons had gone to Port Royal from the Ninth Corps, which, from the number, will bring back about three days. The wagons emptied by your corps last night can, of course, bring up the same number of days' rations from Port Royal that they issued, viz, five days.

THOMAS WILSON,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Chief Commissary of Subsistence.

HEADQUARTERS,

May 26, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel GOODRICH,

Chief Commissary of Subsistence, Ninth Corps:

After the wagons ordered up last evening are emptied, please cause them to return at once. A train is to leave to-morrow for