War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0221 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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of the bridge delayed us. How long am I to leave my bridge at Jericho Ford down? Will the cavalry want it? I suppose not if the other bridges are not washed away. I think the Pamunkey is about 150 feet wide at Mrs. Hundley's and Hanover Ferry, and probably the same at New Castle Ferry. The stream is deep, and flows through a wide bottom, which, however, is quite high above the stream.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 26, 1864.

Major-General WARREN:

The Fifth Corps will be withdrawn at dark by Quarles' Ford bridge and pass via Old Chesterfield, &c. The order indicating route, &c., will be sent you immediately. General Burnside is directed to withdraw Crittenden's division at the same time, after consultation with you.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 26, 1864.

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Army Corps:

Should the rise of the river remove the bridge at Quarles' Ford the withdrawal of the troops of the right wing to-night will be made at Jericho Mills bridge and in the following order: The Sixth Corps will cross first; the Fifth Corps will follow the Sixth Corps; Crittenden's division will follow the Fifth Corps. In the contingency contemplated Major-General Warren will direct the crossing.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

(Same to Wright and Burnside.)

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 26, 1864-3.45 p.m.

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps:

Your pontoon bridge at Jericho Mills will be taken up as soon as your troops cross. The cavalry will not use it in recrossing. You will leave your pickets out as long as practicable consistently with their being able to join your rear guard on the march. General Hancock is directed to withdraw to-night as soon as he can do so without attracting the attention of the enemy, and to leave his pickets as long as practicable consistently with their being withdrawn; the pontoon bridges taken up, and the other bridges destroyed by daylight. General Burnside is directed to withdraw his two divisions to this side in the manner indicated in previous