War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0213 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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cessity, but the risk would be considerable. For instance, General Gibbon has part of his front about 200 yards from the enemy's skirmishers, and General Birney's position is in full view of the enemy.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 26, 1864-10 a.m.

Major-General HANCOCK:

Your telegram of 9.15 a.m. will render it necessary you should withdraw to-night as soon after dark as practicable. Burnside will be directed to withdraw Potter. You will arrange with him as to the order of withdrawing. Burnside will be directed to hold the fords from Ox Ford to Jericho Bridge. You will hold them below. A wooden boat bridge will be thrown in place of the canvas boat taken away as soon as the wooden boats can be brought up, which will be before night. Make all your arrangements preparatory to receiving these orders.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 26, 1864-12 m.

Major-General HANCOCK,

Commanding Second Army Corps:

The major-general commanding directs that you destroy as far back as practicable the Fredericksburg railroad, and that you make such use as you can of the mortars to-day.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

May 26, 1864.

General WILLIAMS:

General Barlow has been working night and day on the railroad toward Milford. All the men have been employed that we had tools for. The musketry fire you may have heard proceeded from General Potter advancing his pickets in order to prevent any impertinent curiosity.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 26, 1864-3.30 p.m.

Major-General HANCOCK,

Commanding Second Corps:

The major-general commanding directs that you withdraw to-night in the manner indicated in previous orders, as soon as it ca be done