War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0205 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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battery you will place in position to sweep up the ravine and over the dam, placing them on the bluff on our left flank in front of Fort Wisconsin or that vicinity. Put this artillery in position to-morrow morning.

Respectfully, &c,.

N. BOWEN

Assistant Adjutant-General.

MAY 25, 1864.

General MARTINDALE,

Commanding Second Division:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs that you send out by daylight precisely, two reconnoitering parties to feel the enemy's pickets and find out where they are. One to go on this side of the ravine in the road to the mill, and the other on the opposite side of the same ravine toward the same mill. You will send your most intelligent officers. Colonel Dutton has just returned and reports no sings of the enemy. He swept about half or three-fourths of a mile along the opposite side of the ravine to the road leading to the mill. Please report as soon as possible the result.

Respectfully, &c.,

N. BOWEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

City Point, Va., May 25, 1864.

Brigadier General E. A. WILD,

Commanding First Brigade:

GENERAL: I am directed by the general commanding to instruct you, upon the arrival of Captain Schwartz's squadron of cavalry, to order the Thirty-seventh Regiment, U. S. Colored Troops, to report to Colonel Kiddoo, at Fort Powhatan, and to adopt measures to forward all detachments belonging to organizations that do not belong to your command now at your station to their proper post at once.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SOLON A. CARTER,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

New Berne, N. C., May 25, 1864.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Several officers of the Fifth Rhode Island Artillery, have been to me to state that Colonel Sisson, of that regiment, had induced, under false representation, several officers to sign a paper, the general tone of which was to injure me. These papers were all withdrawn by the officers, who express deep regret at the manner in which they were deceived, and Colonel Sisson has also been to me to state that he deeply regrets the action he took in the matter, that