War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0194 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter XLVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, May 25, 1864-1.30 p.m.

Major-General WARREN:

Your dispatch of 12 m.received. I do not see that you can do anything more by way of examinations. You now cover your men in your advanced position, and let them rest prior to more active service. I have given the opinion to General Wright that I could see nothing to be gained by crossing Little River. If, however, you think anything important can be done by crossing, you can direct General Wright, in my name, to send a division. Will the stream require bridging, or is it fordable? Can artillery be crossed? I propose, as soon as Sheridan gets up [expected to-day], to send a cavalry force around to the right to reconnoiter. It is of great importance to know whether it is worth while for us to stay here and make any other movement on the enemy's left flank. I should think with the obstacles of Little River and another stream beside the South Anna that such a course is not advisable, but I am not prepared to positively say so for want of information as to the enemy's position beyond Little River. Show this note to Wright, and do what is best after consulting with him.

Respectfully, yours,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

MAY 25, 1864-7.30 p.m.

Major-General MEADE:

I expected to see you as you went over the river, and waited near Crittenden's division where I was examining the lines for some time. I then went to see General Wright but he was out making dispositions for his encampment. I think it was too late to make any demonstration across Little River. This stream is fordable in many places, and is not much of an obstacle. I think Hill's corps is opposite me and I would not advise an attack on the position. I cannot understand the object of his holding this position, which we can easily turn, but if his men would stand well in an attack it gives him a great advantage of interior position in the present disposition of our forces. As it is I do not much fear he will concentrate on either wing of our army. We are tolerably well intrenched already. I lost about 150 men and 10 or 12 officers to-day killed and wounded.

Respectfully, yours,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, May 25, 1864.

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps

[Through General Wright's Headquarters]:

The major-general commanding directs that you withdraw all your teams and such of your artillery as is not in position or required for defense to the north side of the river to-night by the bridge at Quarles' Mills.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.