War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0176 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter XLVIII.

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GENERAL BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS, May 24, 1864-12.30 a.m.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Your dispatch relating to movement of General Grant is received. There is an entire mistake in that part of it relating to Hoke's troops being in the Army of the Potomac, unless they left since last night. There are before me the following brigades, all of which have prisoners taken within the last four days: Ransom's brigade-Forty-ninth North Carolina, Colonel McAfee; Twenty-fourth North Carolina, Clarke; Fifty-sixth North Carolina, Jones. Hunton's [Garnett's old]-Eighth Virginia, Berkeley; Nineteenth Virginia, Gantt; Twenty-eighth Virginia, Allen; Thirty-second Virginia, Montague. Barton's [Armistead's old, Colonel Aylett, of Fifty-third Virginia, commanding] brigade-Ninth Virginia, Owens; Fourteenth Virginia, Hodges; Thirty-eighth Virginia, Edmonds; Fifty-third Virginia, Aylett; Fifty-seventh Virginia, Dyer. Corse's-Twenty-ninth Virginia; Fifteenth Virginia, Morrison; Seventeenth Virginia, Herbert; Thirtieth Virginia, Cary; Eighteenth Virginia, Carrington. Terry's [Kemper's old]-First Virginia, Williams; Third Virginia, Mayo; Seventh Virginia, Patton; Eleventh Virginia, Otey; Twenty-fourth Virginia, Terry, commanding brigade. Hoke's old brigade, Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis now commanding brigade-Sixth North Carolina, Colonel Avery, now at Plymouth; the rest of the brigade are here; Twenty-first North Carolina, Colonel Pfohl; Forty-third North Carolina; Fifty-fourth North Carolina, McDowell: Fifty-seventh North Carolina, Godwin; Twenty-first Georgia, Mercer. Hagood's brigade-Eleventh South Carolina, Colonel Gantt; Twenty-first South Carolina, Colonel Graham; Twenty-fifth South Carolina, Pressley; Twenty-seventh South Carolina. Bushrod Johnson's brigade-Seventeenth Tennessee; Twenty-third Tennessee; Sixty-third Tennessee, Fulkerson; - Tennessee. Wise's brigade-Fifty-ninth Virginia, Tabb, and three Virginia regiments. Clingman's brigade of North Carolina troops. Gracie's, of South Carolina troops is here, and Martin's, of North Carolina troops.

General Walker, of South Carolina and Georgia troops, was captured on Friday. His brigade consists of 4,100 men, by memoranda found in his pocket. The Petersburg Saturday paper admits between 500 and 600 killed and wounded in the contest with us on Friday, in which it says Wise's, Martin's and Clingman's brigades took part. It says: "Our column was under the immediate command of D. H. Hill, but General Beauregard was on the field, and his superior military abilities, of course, contributed largely toward the success of the movements, while his presence inspired the enthusiasm which rendered our men irresistible."

I have a prisoner from Gracie's brigade, of Anderson's division, of Longstreet's corps, and he says that his brigade is here present. A part of Pickett's division went north before we landed here, leaving Petersburg entirely bare of troops until the remainder came from North Carolina. In a conference with a flag of truce to-day my officers talked with the brigade and regimental commanders of two different brigades of two different divisions besides those mentioned in the Petersburg papers. I have prisoners from each of these brigades and from nearly every regiment.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

GENERAL BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS, May 24, 1864-12.30 a.m.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have some 25,000 effective men for duty on this peninsula, besides my own worn-out cavalry and the negro troops necessary to hold open communication at Forts Powhatan, Clark, and Wilson's Wharf. There are nearly 10,000 guarding the various railroads and bridges forming the connections south. I know I am employing one-third more of the enemy's force than I have, yet as soon as I get my lines so strengthened as to be able to leave them in charge of few men I shell resume offensive operations at the earliest moment, I telegraph this to correct what seems to be a misapprehension.

B. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, May 24, 1864-7.30 p.m.

Major-General BUTLER:

General Grant directed that you have 20,000 men, exclusive of artillery and cavalry, which are not wanted, ready to be moved as