War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0172 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter XLVIII.

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FREDERICKSBURG, May 24, 1864. [Received 11.30 a.m.]

Major-General HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

There are 8,000 wounded and sick to be removed from here. Half of them can be sent by railroad. The means for removing them by water is limited, only about 700 being sent yesterday; one of the transports not yet returned. Why not make use of both railroad and transports? Otherwise our men will not get from here in a week. All the transports and boats would be sent to Aquia that cannot be used at Port Royal. Enough of our men to fill them can be sent to Aquia to-day. We await your instructions.

C. C. AUGUR,

Major-General.

FREDERICKSBURG, May 24, 1864. [Received 2.45 p.m.]

Major-General HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

Six hundred wounded have already gone to Aquia this morning, and another train will go this afternoon. The railroad, is in good order. One load of cars have gone to Alexandria, but enough remain to answer the purpose. Abercrombie has sent a portion of his command to Port Royal to-day. The telegraph operator from Belle Plain has also gone to that point. No office at Belle Plain. Sufficient guards are on the railroad. Pontoon bridge for Port Royal left here this morning.

C. C. AUGUR,

Major-General, U. S. Army.

P. S.-General Abercrombie sends word that the wharf at Belle Plain is taken up, and that nothing further can be received there.

C. C. AUGUR,

Major-General.

MAY 24, 1864-12.40 p.m.

Major-General AUGUR,

Fredericksburg:

If railroad has not been broken up, use it to bring away sick and wounded. Use any means you can to get them off as early as possible. Telegraph back if the road can be used, so that the Surgeon-General may send transports to receive wounded at Aquia.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

MAY 24, 1864-12.40 p.m.

Major-General AUGUR,

Fredericksburg:

Chief engineer has just reported that he will keep railroad in operation as long as possible to bring away wounded. Don't let