War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0151 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

and to clear his front, so that he may cross all his force. I am crossing my troops rapidly, and to facilitate the matter am throwing a pontoon bridge by the railroad. At present, the enemy have in Birney's front a line of works with the right well thrown back. They showed six guns just now, which we silenced.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, May 24, 1864-10.45 a.m.

Major-General HANCOCK,

Commanding Second Corps:

I am directed by Major-General Meade to say that he has ordered a division of the Fifth Corps to move down the river and open the ford in front of the Ninth Corps, so that that corps can cross at once and take its place in the line.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[MAY 24, 1864.]

Colonel MILES:

You need not advance to the point indicated. You may for the present hold a position beyond the picket-lines and await developments, protecting well your left flank. I fear you will run into the division of the Fifth Corps. Send this to General Barlow, who will please return it to me.

Respectfully,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS, May 24, 1864-11.05 a.m. [Received 12.55 p.m.]

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: There is a good deal of picket-firing on my front, nearer to my right, where my skirmishers press them. I don't know that it indicates anything of importance. On the left General Gibbon advanced his skirmishers 1 1/2 miles beyond the railroad, when a line of skirmishers from a rifle-pit fired a volley, and checked them. Our troops are nearly all across. The artillery is crossing. The crossing at my permanent bridge is not very safe until that battery in front of General Burnside is silenced, as all my troops crossing at that bridge are fired on, though in each case my guns silence them after a time. I have two pontoon bridges established just below the railroad. I have just returned from the front. We are making everything as secure as possible.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.