War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0147 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE.-UNION.

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geon Phelps, volunteers service, is placed in the immediate charge of the wounded, and will be favored by such spacial instructions as he may receive from the medical director. The trains from the several corps will rendezvous at the general supply train, now in the vicinity of Milford Station. Corps commanders will detail such medical officers and attendants, and provide such medical supplies as may be required by their medical directors, and they will also furnish three days' rations for their wounded. The rations will be cooked if possible.

By command of Major-General Meade:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Numbers 143. May 24, 1864.

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$. The empty wagons about to be sent to Port Royal will be loaded at that place with their proper proportion of subsistence stores, under such instructions as may be given by the chief commissary of their army. An officer of the subsistence department from each corps will company the empty wagons.

By command of Major-General Meade:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

May 24, 1864-12.20 a. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: Your dispatch by Captain Cadwalader is received. I do not, with my present information, consider it practicable to cross here in force successfully, if the enemy hold their line in force. Captain Mackenzie, who accompanies Captain Cadwalader, can give you a full account of their works. General Birney now holds the bridge entire-Taylor's-Taylor Bridge, On Telegraph road-and is building a bridge-heard on the other are entirely under the fire of the enemy's position from the bridge are entirely under the fire the works of the enemy. I can hold the line with a comparatively small force, and think it would be better to send most of the corps to point where a crossing has been effected, promising better results. The railroad bridge has been fired, I am told by the enemy, who hold one end, while I hold the other. It is about 400 feet long. The work General Birney took was surrounded by a most about 8 fete wide.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.