War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0110 Chapter XLVIII. OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C.

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The general commanding trusts taht it will not be necessary for any further order from department headquarters in order to complete the differences in front of the Eighteenth Corps.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

NICOLAS BOWEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, Va., May 22, 1864.

Brigadier General W. T. H. BROOKS,

Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: The general commanding corps desires me to say that he does not think the present disposition of troops along a portion of your front in his opinion a desirable one. He directs taht the space between General Martindale's left and the right of your line in the trenches be occupied by one of the regiments of your command, with sufficient interval between companies, in order to cover the entire space where they will camp. Sentinels will be pasted on the parapets, and this disposition will not be charged unless you or the general commanding corps order it.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

NICOLAS BOWEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, Va., May 22, 1864.

Brigadier Ge. J. H. MARTINDALE,

Commanding Second Division:

GENERAL: The general commanding corps directs me to say that any space left unoccupied by troops in your front be filled by a regiment with such space between companies that the whole may be covered, and you will post sentinels along the parapet. This regiment will camp along the trenches and the disposition will not be charged unless by order of the general commanding corps.

I am, general,

NICOLAS BOWEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 22, 1864.

Major General W. F. SMITH:

SIR: I take the liberty of writhing you a few lines to say I arrived here with a full regiment, over 1,200 men, fully armed and equipped, and well mounted and well drilled and disciplined, expecting to be sent to the front as cavalry. To-day we war order to turn in our horses and arms and to-morrow to draw muskets and act as infantry. I have been in the cavalry service now nearly years, and have done as much as many other officers more favored. I feel the humiliation very sorely. Can you do anything for me? Can you have my regiment ordered under you, or even have myself with