War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0090 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter XLVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, May [22?], 1864-7.15 a. m.

Major-General MEADE:

GENERAL: I have asked at one house since Captain Pease came here, and they say the way to Burke's Shop is by Madison's Ordinary, hen turn to the left about 2 or 3 miles off. But if it is anything like correctly located on the map, we can go in that direction across the open country in the valley of the Ta River. In my vicinity the branches of the Ta head close to the Po, making a very narrow dividing ridge. I have just sent Major Roebling to reconnoiter in the direction to Burke's Shop.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, May 22, 1864-8.30 a. m.

Major-General MEADE:

Colonel Bates' brigade has pushed up the south bank of the Po to the Telegraph road. Nothing visible there but cavalry. Mr. Pound says Ewell's and Longstreet's corps marched down the Telegraph road all last night and are gone south. It was visible this morning from Madison's Ordinary. Colonel Bates got there at 8 a. m.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

MAY 22, 1864-9.30 a. m.

COMMANDING OFFICER FIFTH CORPS:

The major-general commanding directs me to notify you that General Wright is up to this point, and that you can move forward. Wright's men have been up all night, and want rest. He will halt awhile, and then follow you. The major-general commanding suggests that he halt his corps at Madison's Ordinary, where he will be in supporting distance of you, will look toward Spotsylvania Court-House, and keep open communication whit Bowling Green.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

MAY 22, 1864-9.45 a. m.

General MEADE:

Colonel Bates has sent me word that there is nothing but some cavalry watching the vicinity of the Telegraph road. He is on it about a mile south of Stanard's Mill. Mr. Richard Pound, living there, says the troops began to move south at 11 a. m. yesterday, and were passing all night. He says Longstreet and Ewell's corps went that way, and that he was expecting Hill along the same road. I shall now move on, but am afraid General Wright's men will be too tired to keep up. I may have opposition at the crossing of the Mat River.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.