War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0050 Chapter XLVIII. OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C.

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Church. I shall send out a squadron to picket the roads passing in my front. My headquarters are at the Coates house, near the right of my line. The march has been a fatiguing one.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.

P. S.-About 50 cavalrymen attacked my picket-line at 5.12, but were at once driven away.

[Indorsement.]

General [GRANT]:

The within just received. The officer bringing it says it is 16 miles to Hancock. I have retained him to send orders back. Warren was ordered to hold all he had gotten yesterday and to send support to his cavalry at the Ta. I have not ordered him to move till you shall so direct, and indicate the road. If he does move, he had better have another corps in rear in support.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 21, 1864-8 p. m. (Received 4.15 a. m. 22nd.)

Major-General HANCOCK,

Commanding Second Corps:

I am directed to say that the last dispatch received from you was dated 9 a. m. to-day, and to inform you that it has been ascertained from an intercepted dispatch that at any rate one of your notes to these headquarters has fallen into the hands of the enemy. The commanding general considers that with the cavalry force placed at your disposal, you should have kept open communication with him during the day, and he wishes you to use this cavalry force in keeping up frequent communication with these headquarters, and also with General Warren, who is now near Guiney's Bridge. The road is not safe for small parties. It has been necessary to detach a squadron of the provost guard at these headquarters to send this dispatch to you.

I am, very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

May 21, 1864-8.20 p. m. (Received 4 a. m. 22nd.)

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

GENERAL: The only incidents occurring since I came here and took position were a few shells thrown into the heavy artillery on my left to-night. This may have come from the troops from Pole Cat Station, as I heard some musketry in that direction, apparently coming from a line of nervous pickets. I have sent out to investigate it. I am very anxious to hear from you, and have ordered General Torbert to send the mail through without fail.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.