War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0047 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

May 21, 1864-5.30 a. m.

General WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: General Torbert sent a small detachments of cavalry to hold the Guiney Bridge from Spotsylvania. The detachment was too small for the purpose and our cavalry was driven back. I have directed each division commander to hold the road until all the trains are passed, and I have ordered General Torbert to send and adequate force for, the purpose; but I will notify you, in case of any trains passing this was after my troops and trains have passed.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEAQUARTES ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 21, 1864-7.30 a. m.

Major-General HANCOCK,

Commanding Second Corps:

Your dispatch of 4.30 a. m. has been received. I am instructed to inform you that everything is quiet here just now. The enemy is still in force in front of General Warren, although there are indications that he made a considerable movement to his right last night. General Warren's corps will move at 10 a. m. and proceed down the Telegraph road to open communication with you. General headquarters for the present will be near the Fifth Corps, on the Telegraph road.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

May 21, 1864-9 a. m.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I am within 1 mile of Bowling Green. I hear our cavalry firing some small-arms, occasionally artillery; I suppose at Milford. The negroes all along the road in this vicinity give the same report, that General Hoke arrived at Milford yesterday with him 10,000 to 13,000 men (re-enforcements for Lee), and they went across the river.

I send you a paper of the 19th, by which it seems our movement to the right was conjectured. A signal station at Guiney's or opposite has been signaling our movements since daylight. The negroes also say we were expected, and that some artillery was placed in position at Milford.

Your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.