War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0008 Chapter XLVIII. OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C.

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the edge of the field in view of the enemy. They should be directed to pass through the woods to the rear of these headquarters, out of view of the enemy.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864-1 p. m. (Received 2.30 p. m.)

Major-General HANCOCK:

The orders given you yesterday will be repeated to-night. You will start at such time as, in your judgment, will best secure the object of the expedition. Please communication this briefly to Brigadier-General Torbert.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864-7 p. m.

Major-General HANCOCK:

I expect you will find opposition to your crossing of the Mattapony-probably batteries and a small force. Keep your pontoon train near you and endeavor to throw a bridge as soon as possible, at some point where you can command the crossing.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS,

May 20, 1864-8.52 p. m.

General HUMPHREYS:

My command moves at 11 p. m. I shall move as fast as the cavalry can push on before daylight and as rapidly as possible after. i propose to destroy Guiney's, Downer's, and Burke's Brigades. These points will be so far in my rear, I ought not to leave any force to watch them after my column passes, though it ought perhaps to be done.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864-9 p. m.

Major-General HANCOCK:

I see no occasion of the destruction of the bridges proposed by you. They will be wanted for communication and for other columns. Unless the enemy attack us to-morrow, you will be followed on your right flank, early in the day, by Warren, who will move on the Telegraph road. Perhaps I do not understand the bridges referred to. Do you men those you will cross, and are these bridges on roads to your right flank leading into the one you move on? Even then, they will be needed to keep up communication with Warren, in case he succeeds in crossing the Po.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.