War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0983 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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Thanks to a merciful Providence our casualties have been small. Among the wounded are Brigadier-General H. T. Hays and H. H. Walker.

R. E. LEE.

(Same to the President and General Bragg.)

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, May 10, 1864-8.15 p.m.

General EWELL:

GENERAL: It will be necessary for you to re-establish your whole line to-night. Set the officers to work to collect and refresh their men and have everything ready for the renewal of the conflict ad daylight to-morrow. I wish General Rodes to rectify his line and improve its defenses, especially that part which seemed so easily overcome this afternoon. If no flanking arrangement a ditch had better be dug on the outside, and an abatis made in front. Perhaps General Grant will make a night attack as it was a favorite amusement of his at Vicksburg. See that ammunition is provided and every man supplied.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., May 10, 1864.

Colonel BRADLEY T. JOHNSON:

Have you heard of the whereabouts of the enemy? Have Stuart and Fitz. Lee, or either, actually moved? They should do so by all means at once, if not on their way.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

HANOVER JUNCTION, May 10, 1864-10.40 p.m. (Received 11.30.)

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

At 5 p.m. the enemy were grazing their horses at Ground Squirrel Bridge on the South Anna, 9 miles from here. I have as yet no proof that he is going to Richmond. Have sent out scouts to intercept the head of a column moving in that direction. I will report as soon as heard from.

BRADLEY T. JOHNSON,

Colonel, Commanding.

HANOVER JUNCTION, May 10, 1864. (Received Richmond, 7.45.)

Major S. B. FRENCH,

Commissary of Subsistence:

The enemy were reported at Negro Foot about 3 o'clock and are moving rapidly. All information indicates they are pushing for Richmond. Force estimated at 8,000 to 12,000, with about twenty pieces of artillery and a large wagon train.

GEO. W. T. KEARSLEY,

Major, C. S.