War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0823 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS,

May 16, 1864-12.45 p. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

Has any intelligence been received of Colonel Grant's confirmation as brigadier-general? I wish to assign him as such if proper to do so.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS,

May 16, 1864. (Received 1 p. m.)

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I hold bridge at Anderson's Mill with infantry. Have sent cavalry to hold Smith's Mill crossing and all roads back to Massaponax Church. A negro man says he heard rebel cavalry, driven away from Anderson's Mill last evening, say they were ordered to Bowling Green. The following distances are, I believe, pretty reliable: Anderson's Mill to Court-House, 3 miles; Anderson's Mill to Massaponax Church, 1 1/2 miles; Anderson's Mill to Smith's Mill or Telegraph road, 1 mile; Smith's Mill Massaponax Church, by Telegraph road, 2 miles; Smith's Mill to Court-House, 7 miles by a road leaving Telegraph road and running in parallel direction with that from Anderson's Mill to Court-House. All these are dirt roads.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 16, 1864-1.10 p. m.

General WRIGHT:

The Secretary of War has telegraphed Lieutenant-General Grant that all pending nominations of officers of this army with the exception of Brigadier-General Carr have been confirmed. Don't you think you had better push your cavalry to your left and front to examine the country as far as the enemy will let them go, instead of having them to the left and rear. I think you need feel no anxiety about your flanks. Did a regiment report to you yesterday from Lieutenant-General Grant in addition to the Fifth New York that I sent?

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 16, 1864-1.30 p. m.

General WRIGHT:

Warren reporting no change in the enemy's position and some in his front, and that he cannot well advance his pickets to any good purpose, he has been authorized to hold on. The same considerations will govern you. If you are satisfied the enemy are in force in your front, and have not changed position, it is all that is necessary.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.