War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0810 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter XLVIII.

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that ambulances with wounded can no longer run between here and Fredericksburg. All offensive operations necessarily cease until we can have twenty-four hours of dry weather. The army is in the best of spirits and feel the greatest confidence in ultimate success. The promptness with which you have forwarded re-enforcements will contribute greatly to diminishing our mortality list and in insuring a complete victory. You can assure the President and Secretary of War that the elements alone have suspended hostilities and that it is in no manner due to weakness or exhaustion on our part.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, May 16, 1864-1 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

Near Spotsylvania, Va.:

A new regiment of Pennsylvania cavalry ordered here. I propose to dismount the men and send them forward as infantry. Shall I give the horses to veteran cavalry, Army of the Potomac, or send them to General Sheridan, who asks for 1,000 horses? Railroad from Aquia Creek to Falmouth can be repaired in eight days. Shall it be done? General Sherman defeated the rebels yesterday, and a part of his force has crossed the Oostenaula River. Our loss about 3,000 in all. A messenger just arrived from General Sheridan. He is at Haxall'a Landing, on James River, and has received supplies for men and horses.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

WASHINGTON, May 16, 1864-9.30 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

Near Spotsylvania, Va.:

there is considerable dissatisfaction in the artillery and cavalry regiments sent forward as infantry, especially in the latter. I respectfully recommend that they be put in old brigades and divisions in the front. One successful fight will remove all dissatisfaction, and, if not, dissatisfaction will do o harm there. Sherman still successful.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, May 16, 1864.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Near Spotsylvania:

MY DEAR GENERAL: I think you will concur with me that Meade and Sherman should be made major-generals of the army, and Hancock and H. G. Wright should be made brigadier-generals of the army in their places. Of the four I think Wright has the