War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0599 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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giving each directions to leave the usual bridge guard of pontoniers [some 15 to 18 men, with non-commissioned officers] that suffices for the ordinary care and repair of bridges laid somewhat permanently.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. BENHAM,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.-12.20 p.m.-While the above letter was being copied I received information from General Rucker that the teams I had asked for had been ordered to this camp, and that the water transportation was ready at the Sixth-street wharf, from which I shall hope that the bridge will reach Aquia Creek full as early as stated.

Very truly,

H. W. BENHAM,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS, May 10, 1864-6.40 a.m.

[General HUMPHREYS:]

GENERAL: I inclose you a report* of Colonel McKeen in reference to the bridge, &c. Colonel Morgan has not yet returned from his reconnaissance. I find from the proprietor here that on the other side there is a flat of bottom timber [the enemy are now in and fortifying] with rifle-pits on one side of the road, after it passes through the wood and runs to the Block house. There is an open field to that place. On an eminence commanding the bridge on the other side of the road there is the small pine of the country. I am anxious to meet your views, but I desire to make an explanation as to the causes of the delay. Now, if it is a positive order to make the crossing there, my troops will do it as well as any. I think it would be better, however, if we were all on one side of the stream. The country on which I stand is excellent ground for fighting on should I be attacked here.

Your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS, May 10, 1864- 7 a.m.

[General A. A. HUMPHREYS:]

GENERAL: From a high tree on my front the enemy's position can be seen with a glass. They are busily engaged in throwing up works against me, and the infantry are packing rails for their line. The ground beyond the river is considerably open, with meadow land to the right. Farther to the right the river is intercepted by the tall timber on this side. I think this point was the original end of their line, for the line of their batteries appears to be facing the other way.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.

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*Not found.

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