War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0567 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS, Todd's Tavern, May 9, 1864-1.15 p.m.

General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have received your dispatch in reference to leaving the heavy artillery at this point, and have given orders for that purpose, placing it under the orders of General Mott until it is sent for.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS, May 9, 1864-7 p.m.

General MEADE:

SIR: General Barlow is already going to advance, and I have told Gibbon to allow him to pass if he is not himself ready.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS, May 9, 1864-10 p.m.

[General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:]

GENERAL: The advance of my column rests at the bridge over the Po, about 1 mile from the Block house, and half way between the cross-road and Block house. When the head of the column reached the river it was dark, and, owing to the great difficulties of an advance, Colonel Morgan halted the column until he could communicate with me, and I have not yet ordered it forward. The river is so deep that the flankers and skirmishers could not cross without swimming, and the darkness and thick woods near the stream caused great confusion and risk of firing into our men. I am informed that the bridge is intact.

The cross-roads is held by a regiment, and the rear of column rests near the same point. The skirmishers are on the river, and the flankers about one-third of a mile out. Knowing that General Grant's intention was for the column to move on, I can still give the order, but do not think it wise, and await your instruction. A skirmish line [thin], supposed of cavalry, came on the right flank near the cross-road. Heth's division, Hill's corps, passed the cross-road from 8 to 11 this morning; since then it has been held by 200 cavalry and a section of artillery. I cannot cross the river to-night without calling in my flankers and skirmishers and crossing them on the bridge. You can judge of the propriety of the measure-if the enemy are there. If they are not there, they have probably disappeared from Crawford's front.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.