War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0540 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N.C. Chapter XLVIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

with what was on hand of General Robinson's division, led by himself in person, and General Griffin's division by himself. General Robinson's troops fought with reluctance, and fell back, himself severely wounded in the knee. This exposed General Griffin's left, and part of his command fell back too, all in much confusion, refusing much of our attempts to stop them, till they got out of fire. They will soon stop, and can perhaps be assembled again to-day. General Griffin, however, held on. I sent General Crawford to his support and then General Cutler, and they have held on, and at this time are again advancing in fine style. We have taken prisoners from General Longstreet's corps.

WARREN.

[Indorsement.]

An aide who brought this says that the prisoners belonged to General McLaws' division, Longstreet's corps. I am in hopes this may be some mounted infantry given to Stuart to strengthen him. I hardly think Longstreet is yet at Spotsylvania. Sedgwick's best division joined Warren just as this dispatch was written. I have told him to call for the one here if necessary, and to attack vigorously without loss of time, but I fear the morale of his men is impaired.

GEO. G. MEADE.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, May 8, 1864-12 m.

General WARREN:

Your dispatch is received. General Sedgwick has one division now with you, and another at this place ready to move forward to support you. Attack vigorously. Let the men know it is our interest to prevent a concentration to stop our march, and that they should drive them.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, May 8, 1864-12.30 p.m.

General HUMPHREYS:

We have finally succeeded in pushing back the enemy as far as we have tried, but have not quite gained the junction of the Catharpin road with the one I have been moving on. General Wright has brought up his division to support me. I have again suffered heavily, especially in stragglers. The Second Division (Robinson's) is quite disorganized. I have lost no prisoners; the men simply straggle back into the woods fatigued and wounded. I have done my best, but with the force I now have I cannot attack again unless I see very great weakness on the enemy's left flank. It would be well to send troops of Sedgwick's near the woods to me, and to move on with Hancock's down half way. I have fought the division of cavalry and taken prisoners from at least two divisions of Longstreet's corps. They say his whole corps is here. His men left the trenches last night at 11 o'clock, and are as tired as mine. His wagons are seen moving south on the Catharpin road. Colonel Locke is badly