War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0539 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

have to clear the way or make way a little himself for me to get to the front. Perhaps he will succeed without my help; and, if not, a little rest to my men will help them very much. I am aware of the importance of getting on to Spotsylvania Court-House as soon as may be, and should have taken the front and attacked if the cavalry had not been moving up to do it. I have one division now massed. The fighting is about a mile in front of me.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

MAY 8, 1864-6.45 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I started my troops forward at 6 o'clock; nearly two divisions have passed where General Merritt's headquarters is. General Robinson's division had the advance and he has been directed to spare no effort to clear the road. Having now heard from all my staff officers, left to the rear at different points to enforce instructions, I am now going to the immediate front to direct the advance. If anything happens to me, General Crawford is the next officer in rank. My wagons began to haul out at Chancellorsville at daylight. My pickets were not relieved till near 3 a.m. They report the enemy chopping along their front during the night. The head of General Burnside's corps had reached Chancellorsville before daylight I know, and also that the last of General Willcox's division left the Wilderness Run before daylight. The cavalry in my front here have, I think, made no advance to-day. I sent my men forward at General Merritt's intimation that, under the circumstances, I could push the enemy faster than he could. It is difficult to do much with the troops in an expeditious manner in these dense woods.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.

MAY 8, 1864-8 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

The opposition to us amounts to nothing as yet; we are advancing steadily, the enemy uses artillery, two pieces, on the road. General Robinson has gone ahead with a brigade, mostly in line. I follow close with columns filling the road, and artillery; if there is nothing but cavalry, we shall scarcely halt, if our troops can be made to move, but they are exceedingly hesitating, I think. General Robinson's orders are to use only the bayonet, and carry every battery the enemy shows. It is believed to be Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, May 8, 1864-10.15 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I reached the vicinity of the blacksmith shop at the intersection of the road from Piney Branch Church, the road we were on, toward Spotsylvania Court-House. I promptly attacked the enemy here