War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0485 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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an abundant supply of ammunition for them on hand. I send by this mail a copy of heavy artillery, which contains and addition to the old range table prepared by General Barry, giving the best rifle ranges known to me; also a similar table prepared by Captain Treadwell, Ordnance Department. I inclose a table of experiments on the new-moded 10-inch mortar, to show the difference between the Gomer and elliptical chamber; also a copy of a report of some experiments with spherical case from a 10-inch mortar, which are so successful that I have ordered a large supply of 12-pounder spherical case balls for our train. I also think of taking two 12-pounder Whitworths along. They make elegant sharpshooting to dismount guns. They are very light, and may be of service for such special uses. The following is the present condition of my train afloat: 4 1/2-inch-18 guns, 20 carriages, 20 implements, 20 platforms, 6,520 rounds; 30-pounders-10 guns, 20 carriages, 10 implements, 20 platforms, 5,025 rounds; 10-inch mortars-10 guns, 10 carriages, 10 implements, 10 platforms, 2,000 projectiles; 8-inch mortars-20 guns, 9 carriages, 20 implements, 2,600 projectiles; 8-inch siege howitzers-10 guns, 4 carriages; Coehorns-3,796 projectiles; 100-pounders-6 guns, 6 carriages, 1,400 projectiles; 1,250 barrels powder, 1 battery wagon, 1 forge, 4 sling carts.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

RAPPAHANNOCK STATION, May 7, 1864.

General H. W. BENHAM,

Commanding Engineer Brigade, Near Navy-Yard, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I am here at the station. The army has passed, and I have swung the bridge to this side. Have not received any orders from General Burnside, and have had no means of communicating to you. My rations are out, and I am obliged to be on the guard night and day to protect our bridge. I send this by a train going to Washington.

I remain, your obedient servant,

H. V. SLOSSON,

Captain Company D, Fifteenth New York Volunteers.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., May 7, 1864.

Major General W. S. HANCOCK, U. S. Volunteers,

Commanding Second Corps (Through Commanding General Army of the Potomac):

GENERAL: Your application of the 1st instant for permission to ride in a spring wagon until your wound is healed has been duly submitted. In reply I have respectfully to inform you that the decision upon this and the similar cases is left to Major-General Meade, and the Department sees no objection to the privilege being granted you.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.