War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0481 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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nearest, and I have not yet ascertained precisely the locality of the troops changing last night, though I know they are in position. I have told Hancock to call on Burnside. He now has, I think, Stevenson.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES, May 7, 1864.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

Burnside has but two divisions and rather a long line to hold, so that I think it would not be prudent to remove any of his men, except to move to the front, until our line is entirely changed. I will instruct him, however, to assist Hancock in case of an attack either as suggested above by an advance or to move round with his whole force in case there is evidence of the enemy's massing on Hancock, leaving the line between Hancock and Warren as it was before Burnside came up. If our line has been shortened as was directed last night, is there not a large surplus of troops on the right?

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES, May 7, 1864-6.30 a. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: Make all preparations during the day for a night march, to take position at Spotsylvania Court-House with one army corps; at Todd's Tavern with one, and another near the intersection of Piney Branch and Spotsylvania Railroad with the road from Alsop's to Old Court-House. If this move should be made, the trains should be thrown forward early in the morning to the Ny River. I think it would be advisable in making this change to leave Hancock where he is until Warren passes him. He could then follow and become the right of the new line. Burnside will move to Piney Branch Church. Sedgwick can move along the pike to Chancellorsville, thence to Piney Branch Church and on to his destination. Burnside will move on the plank road to the intersection of it with the Orange and Fredericksburg plank road, then follow Sedgwick to his place of destination. All vehicles should be got out of hearing of the enemy before the troops move, and then move off quietly. It is more than probable the enemy will concentrate for a heavy attack on Hancock* this afternoon. In case they do we must be prepared to resist them and follow up any success we may gain with our whole force. Such a result would necessarily modify these instructions. All the hospitals should be moved to-day to Chancellorsville.

Respectfully, &c.,

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

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*The words "on Hancock" not in copy furnished to General Burnside.

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31 R R-VOL XXXVI, PT II