War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0428 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N.C. Chapter XLVIII.

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HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 5, 1864-5.30 p.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: The enemy's cavalry in strong force attacked General Wilson at Graig's Church. I sent General Gregg out to his support. General Gregg is now driving the enemy in the direction of Craig's Church. Everything is going on very well.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. H. SHERIDAN.

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 5, 1864-6 p.m.

Major-General SHERIDAN,

Commanding Cavalry Corps:

I am directed by the major-general commanding to acknowledge receipt of dispatch of General Gregg of 2.45 p.m. If Gregg's and Wilson's divisions are compelled to fall back, the commanding general directs that you cover our left flank and protect the trains as much as possible. The left flank at present rests at the intersection of the Brock road with the Orange plank road, the line extending to Germanna Ford. The infantry has been heavily pressed to-day along the whole line. If you gain any information that leads you to conclude that you can take the offensive and harass the enemy without endangering the trains, you are at liberty to do so.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,

Chancellorsville, May 5, 1864-11.10 p.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that General Wilson was attacked to-day at Craig's Meeting-House. At first he drove the enemy on the Catharpin road for some distance, then they drove him back to Todd's Tavern, where he was joined by General Gregg's command. General Gregg attacked the enemy and drove them back to Beach Grove, distance about 4 miles. I cannot do anything with the cavalry, except to act on the defensive, on account of the immense amount of material and trains here and on the road to Ely's Ford. Had I moved to Hamilton's Crossing early this morning the enemy would have ruined everything. Why cannot infantry be sent to guard the trains and let me take the offensive? The casualties of the Second and Third Divisions to-day are between 50 and 60.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. H. SHERIDAN.

Major-General, Commanding.