War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0395 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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lying at anchor off the island. The last four are crippled, however, and at the earnest solicitation of the commander of the fleet, I have the quartermaster's boat Massassoit to assist these boats in case they get ashore or break down when in sight of the ram.

It is needless for me to inform you that I do not at all agree with Colonel Wardrop in thinking the ram "in possession of the sounds" because she happens to be in Alligator River. I have a better opinion of our naval forces, and with due diligence on their part she can do no further damage. I do not share in the fears of many people about the ram. I permit myself, even now, to regard the fall of Plymouth as the result of an accident - the death of Lieutenant-Commander Flusser by the gun that he fired himself; and if one-fourth part of the energy of that lamented officer is displayed by the other commanders, the ram will soon cease to be.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General.

CAMP PALMER, May 4, 1864 - 5.45 p. m.

Captain PARKINSON:

I am informed that my pickets have been attacked.

JAMES W. SAVAGE,

Colonel Twelfth Cavalry.

CAMP PALMER, May 4, 1864 - 6 p. m.

Captain PARKINSON:

The enemy have artillery and have passed the Gully.

J. W. SAVAGE.

CAMP PALMER, May 4, 1864 - 6.30 p. m.

Lieutenant WILLIAM M. PRATT,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

The attack is in force, I think. The enemy have appeared in sight of Rocky Run. They have either cavalry or mounted infantry. I do not hear a word from Colonel Claassen.

JAMES W. SAVAGE,

Colonel.

OUTPOSTS, May 4, 1864 - 6.40 p. m.

Colonel SAVAGE:

Can you give me any idea of the enemy's force? How are matters at Rocky Run?

P. J. CLAASSEN,

Colonel, Commanding.