War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0373 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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FORTRESS MONROE, VA., May 4, 1864.

(Received 4.10 a. m. 5th.)

Colonel G. H. SHARPE,

Provost-Marshal, Army of the Potomac:

Please send me any statement that the man you spoke of in your dispatch of 2nd has to make. The dispatch was not received till late last night; wires down; no news. Beauregard and Wise are in Virginia somewhere; can't place them; hope to know in a day or two; will communicate with you; letter goes to-night.

JOHN I. DAVENPORT,

Lieutenant, & c.

ARTILLERY HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 4, 1864.

Colonel ABBOT:

MY DEAR COLONEL: I have received your note of the 1st instant, and am glad to see things are progressing so favorably. I see you have as yet no Coehorns shipped, and that reminds me to ask you how many Coehorn mortars can be got. We will probably need all we can get. I have eight with me, and it would be well for the Ordnance Department to collect all they can. We move to-morrow; so you will soon hear from us in some shape, and will know about how soon the siege train will be required. Address as usual.

Truly, yours,

HENRY J. HUNT,

Brigadier-General.

P. S. - Would it not be well for you to set apart a few men, with a good officer with some experimental practice with light 12-pounders to be used as mortars, i. e., try the ranges with different weights of powder, and see how the carriage will stand it, if necessary, to throw very heavy showers of shell in curved fire? I think that by digging a hole, and so lowering the trail - diminishing the charge - we will, at a pinch, be able to turn our light 12-pounders to very good account. Provision should be made, if the experiments prove satisfactory, to send on short notice a supply of 12-pounder shell. Can you send me, with your next letter to headquarters Army of the Potomac, a table of ranges for heavy rifled guns - 30-pounder Parrotts and 4 1/2 inch? I have none, and would like to have them about me; also a copy of heavy artillery.

Yours, truly,

H.

WASHINGTON NAVY-YARD, May 4, 1864.

Captain H. S. SLOSSON,

Commanding Pontoon Detachment, Rappahannock:

The commanding general desires to know whether you laid down or exchanged the bridge you took on with you, and if you expect that General Burnside will be able to allow yourself and the most of your men to return. Lieutenant Sergeant is needed here as soon as he can be spared.

H. W. BENHAM,

Brigadier-General.