War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0266 Chapter XLVIII. OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C.

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works. That portion of the line resting on Ashton Creek and extending to the center of the Seventeenth South Carolina Volunteers, after advancing nearly a mile, found itself on the right of the batteries seen from the Ashbrooke house, and at right angles to the enemy's line, which trends off to the river in a line perpendicular to our entrenchments. These skirmishers met no enemy. The skirmishers in front of the left wing of the Seventeenth South Carolina Volunteers advanced a little over half a mile, encountered a strong picket of the enemy, drove it in, killing 5 men, taking 2 prisoners, an suffering a loss of 2 wounded, and then retreated before a regiment of infantry which was moved on its right flank. The line in front of the Twenty-second South Carolina Volunteers (the left of the brigade) advanced upon the works seen from the Ashbrooke house, driving in the pickets, occupying a portion of the rifle-pits, column of infantry having advanced from the enemy's works. A heavy column of infantry having advanced from the enemy's entrenchments, having suffered in killed, wounded, and missing a loss of 2 commissioned officers and 30 privates.

I regret to say Colonel O. M. Dantzler, Twenty-second South Carolina Volunteers, fell mortally wounded while gallantly leading his men up to the enemy's breast-works, and that he was left in the hands of the enemy. The line of skirmishers was subsequently ordered by me to reoccupy its former position, to which it fell back in good order. The engagement of this morning shows that the enemy still occupied the works in our front with a strong force of artillery and infantry.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

STEPHEN ELLIOTT, JR.,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Captain R. E. FOOTE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 109. Reports of Captain W. L. Trenholm, Seventh South Carolina Cavalry, of operations May 15-16.

HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON CAVALRY,

Tom Hinto Creek, Dinwiddie County, Va., May 16, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that my command reached this point yesterday evening at 9 o'clock. I sent forward from Blacks and Whites two scouting parties, each in charge of an officer, one to follow the line of the South Side Railroad and the other on the route taken by the enemy. Both parties returned about daylight this morning, the latter bringing the intelligence that the enemy crossed to Nottoway at Gill's Bridge yesterday at 3 p. m.; tore up the bridge. The party of the Fifth South Carolina Cavalry crossed at the next bridge below, having sent information on to Petersburg by a courier furnished them from my party. Dr. Jones, of Brunswick County, came into my camp last night to report the enemy at his uncle's plantation, 5 miles from Gill's Bridge, west i. e., toward Lunenburg Court-House. I have this morning sent two parties, each under an officer,