War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0235 Chapter XLVIII. SOUTH SIDE OF THE JAMES.

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[Indorsement.]

DECEMBER 1, 1864.

Respectfully submitted to the President.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., March 20, 1865.

Captain R. G. H. KEAN,

Chief of Bureau of War:

DEAR SIR: Mr. Burton N. Harrison, private secretary, directs the return of the inclosed papers, to be filed with the proceedings of a court of inquiry in case of General S. M. Barton, referred to your office for file from this office on the 9th instant.

I am, respectfully, yours,

M. H. CLARK,

Clerk.

Numbers 92. Report of Colonel George K. Griggs, Thirty-eighth Virginia Infantry, of operations May 3-27.

HDQRS. THIRTY-EIGHTH VIRGINIA REGIMENT,

November --, 1864.

COLONEL: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my regiment in the present campaign:

At the opening of the campaign the regiment, 303 strong, commanded by Colonel Joseph R. Cabell, was doing duty an New, McClellan, and Grape Vine Bridges, on the Chickahominy River. On May 5 it was ordered to and marched with the brigade to Hanover Junction. On May 7 it took train at Taylorsville for Richmond, nd thence to Drewry's Bluff, and performed duty in trenches until May 10. It was engaged with its brigade (Barton's) and fought the forces of General Butler, U. S. Army, estimated at from 20,000 to 30,000 strong, upon the Richmond and Petersburg turnpike. In this action my regiment was formed on the left of the brigade and left of the turnpike. About 9 a. m. the signal of advance was given; the regiment moved forward and soon engaged the enemy's skirmishers, driving them upon their line of battle. At this point I found my left entirely unproved the fact to Colonel Cabell and one of General Barton's staff and deployed my left (Company K, Lieutenant W. G. Cabaniss commanding) par pendicularly to my line of battle and continued the advance, breaking and driving back three lines of battle. The regiment captured two pieces of artillery.

My rank having in this time become so much depleted from casualties, and the enemy on my left having passed around in my rear, I was ordered by Captain Thom, assistant adjutant and inspector general, to fall back, and, turning about, the regiment fought its way out, killing about 15, wounding many, and capturing 50 of the