War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0220 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter XLVIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

We, the undersigned staff officers of the brigade, fully indorse the above communication and unite in the petition for the restoration of General Barton to the command of the brigade.

Very respectfully,

B. S. THOMPSON,

Major and Quartermaster.

J. D. DARDEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

W. W. HERBERT,

Major and Commissary of Subsistence.

A. C. THOM,

Assistant Adjutant and Inspector General.

W. L. RANDOLPH,

First Lieutenant and Ordnance Officer.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS BARTON'S BRIGADE,

May 14, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded.

So far as i have been able to ascertain General Barton has the entire confidence of his brigade, and I would be gratified to see him restored to the command.

D. B. FRY,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF RICHMOND,

May 19, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded.

Having been absent from my office for a week nearly is the cause of delay in forwarding this paper. On Tuesday, the 10th instant a reconnaissance with Barton's and Gracie's brigades, together with Shingler's cavalry and Dunovant's dismounted men, was made to ascertain the strength, position, &c., of the enemy near or on Winfree's farm, on the turnpike road leading to Petersburg. General. Barton was directed to cover the country from the railroad to the turnpike with a line of skirmishers. Very soon after crossing Proctor's Creek it was ascertained that a line of over half a mile next the railroad was without a man. I directed General Barton in person to have the gap filled. After some considerable delay I inquired if the line of battle was formed, but General Barton was very slow in getting his men into position. Shortly after the attack was made General Barton reported that his left was being turned. I directed him to press his line to the left, as the movement on our part was toward the left. But a short time elapsed before General Barton again reported to me that his left was flanked. I order [him] to go at once in person and regain his position by moving his regiments to the left. Mean time General Gracie was brought to the right. General Gracie had gone down the river road. General Barton had one regiment and a half of a second on the left of the turnpike. This regiment and a half were forces across the turnpike to the right and