War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0197 Chapter XLVIII. SOUTH SIDE OF THE JAMES.

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pressing the enemy back in front of our center, disabling and capturing some artillery. Ransom stormed breast-works; took 4 stand of colors and about 300 prisoners. Our losses, on the whole, appear not to be heavy. I think I can rely on Whiting's support. Distant firing now heard in direction of Petersburg.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

General BRAXTON BRAGG.

DREWRY'S BLUFF, May 16, 1864.

It is now 9.45 o'clock. Ransom has been delayed to replenish ammunition. When he comes up I will push the enemy. For future movements we want ordnance supplies of all sorts, especially for infantry, forwarded instantly. I hope soon to make a junction with Whiting. Our captured of prisoners are considerable, with some artillery; numbers not yet known.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

General BRAXTON BRAGG.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES CONFEDERATE STATES,

Richmond, May 18, 1864.

Copy of telegram dated Drewry's Bluff, May 16, 1864, received May 16, 1864, viz:

Since my dispatch of 8.30 a. m., announcing the success of General Ransom on our left, General Hoke's division, supported by General Colquitt's reserve, attacking the enemy in force on the right, has driven him back, capturing several siege field pieces and many prisoners. Bot of these commands have acted gallantly, and with brilliant success.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

General BRAGG.

DREWRY'S BLUFF, May 17, 1864.

P. S.-I send a supplementary dispatch to complete the telegram received of yesterday's battle. Please have published, as it is due to Hoke and Colquitt.

Respectfully submitted to the Adjutant-General for his information.

JNO. B. SALE,

Colonel and Military Secretary.

DREWRY'S BLUFF, May 16, 1864.

GENERAL: It is now 1.15 o'clock. No material change since last dispatch. We occupy the outer lines. The enemy still in our front with open ground between. We are preparing for a combined attack by reorganization of commands somewhat scattered by frequent detachments and thick woods. Some of the brigades are much cut up. The position of things is too uncertain as yet for me to advance any such detachment of force to the interior as you propose. I hear nothing yet of Whiting's movements. I am on the turnpike at outer line forts.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

General B. BRAGG,

Commanding General.