War of the Rebellion: Serial 068 Page 0121 Chapter XLVIII. SOUTH SIDE OF THE JAMES.

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To which he replied as follows, in writing:

My line will be very weak. It will be weakened more by Turner's advancing.

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

At 6 p. m. took an order to General Marston, who was then on the left of General Weitzel and the Petersburg and Richmond turnpike:

To report to General Weitzel with his command, marching by the right flank down the road which he was then in advance of.

At the same time I informed General Weitzel--

That General Marston's brigade would report to him, and that he would post them as a reserve.

My 13, when we arrived at Proctor's Creek, I was sent back to General Butler with the following request:

To order the battery of light 12-pounders, which were then near his headquarters, to report to General Smith.

To which he replied as follows:

Tell General Smith that I think there are only four guns near my headquarters, and that I will order them to the front immediately. Also tell him that I will order the battery of 20-pounder Parrotts forward.

General Butler's headquarters then were where we had ours the night before.

May 14, a short time after daylight, I carried the following order to General Weitzel:

To advance his line, and that General Brooks was then advancing.

5 a. m. informed General Turner--

That General Brooks' line then occupied the rebel entrenchments, and that General Weitzel's line was advancing, and ordered him to advance his line so that it occupied the rebel works and connected with General Brooks.

12 m. I sent the following communication, signed by General Smith, to General Butler:

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, May 14-12 m.

Major-General BUTLER:

I have no use for light 12-pounders. I know where my own batteries are, and have very respectfully to say that I can order them up as they are needed. I had supposed that some of General Gillmore's batteries, not to be otherwise employed, might be used to advantage here, and therefore sent the request to have the rifled batteries ordered here.

WM. F. SMITH,

Major-General of Volunteers.

I answer to the following communication, which had just then been received from General Butler:

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, Half-Way House, May 14, 1864.

General SMITH:

I have ordered Onderdonk out on a reconnaissance to see what the trains mean. I think they mean ammunition and supplies. Certain it is that 1,000 men can march 8 miles sooner than they can be loaded and unloaded on a railroad train and carried 8 miles. I have ordered all the rifled guns up. I hope you will get them into position so that they can be used. I would not make an assault until I had used all my artillery. I have also ordered Beecher's battery of light 12-pounders to report to you.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.