War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0536 S. C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. Chapter XLVII.

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men returned made four or five trips to Horseshoe Island. A number of shell were fired from the battery on Horseshoe Island, and a few rockets were thrown at our pickets late this afternoon. No casualties. All quiet at present.

WM. B. TALIAFERRO,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF S. CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., June 22, 1864.

Major General L. McLAWS,

Commanding, &c., District of Georgia:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs me to say that he approves the suggestions contained in your letter of the 19th instant, and that you are hereby authorized to carry them into effect. The route proposed will be adopted.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. S. STRINGFELLOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Savannah, Ga., June 22, 1864.

Major STRINGFELLOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Brigadier General H. R. Jackson, who was appointed a brigadier-general and assigned to duty with the reserve forces of the State of Georgia, has reported to me for duty, by order of Major General Howell Cobb, who has charge of the organization of the reserve forces of the State of Georgia. About ten companies of reserves are now at this place. Four of them came without arms, but a supply arrived this morning, which, however, are totally out of order, and three-fourths of them unserviceable, wanting repairs. General Jackson thus reports to me for duty with about 400 effective men.

I respectfully request to be informed if General Cobb has authority to assign a brigadier-general of his command to duty with me, when the force which this officer brings with him is but the command of a colonel. And if he has the right, can the officer so assigned claim a territorial command? Again, if he is assigned to duty with me and has a territorial or district command, can General Cobb call on him for duty with the reserve forces in the State? In other words, is General Jackson, after he reports to me, to be considered as an officer of the Confederate States, liable to be ordered anywhere, out of the State and elsewhere, or is he for duty in the State only? I ask these questions in order solely to prevent misunderstanding and bad feeling in the future between all parties. If General Jackson is considered to be regularly on duty be General Cobb's assignment, I can assign him to a district command, where his service will be important and valuable to the country. He is now here awaiting my orders, and I beg that you will give answer to this as soon as possible.

Very respectfully,

L. McLAWS,

Major-General, Commanding.