War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0529 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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sent you from Captain Keitt of what transpires along the entire front. These reports you will forward for information, and in case there is anything unusual you will report it by telegraph.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. F. NANCE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. FIRST MILITARY DIST. OF SOUTH CAROLINA,

Charleston, June 13, 1864.

Colonel ALFRED RHETT,

Commanding, Sullivan's Island:

COLONEL: The brigadier-general commanding desires that you will impress upon your guards and pickets the urgent necessity, at this time, for a thorough vigilance in the discharge of their duties. It is important that these headquarters should be promptly apprised of all that takes place on the part of the enemy within the observation of your command, as well as any unusual occurrence in the command itself. Desertions at this time may result very injuriously to us, and every effort should be made to prevent them. I am also directed to inquire if your cavalry force at night is sufficient.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. F. NANCE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S. C., June 13, 1864.

Lieutenant S. C. BOYLSTON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have the honor to report, pursuant to instructions, in regard to matter contained in the accompanying communication, that the engineer's boat was taken from the cove on the night of the 10th instant, and that Privates bond and Amberg, Company C, and Privates Gately and Conroy, of Company D, First South Carolina Artillery, left this island on the same night, which, of course, is strong circumstantial evidence that they were the persons who took the boat. After a careful investigation, I have been unable to determine where these men have gone, whether to the enemy or to the city. There is no evidence whatever that would indicate that they have deserted to the former. Where they got oars to row the boat, if they had any, I have also been unable to imagine. The oars to Colonel Rhett's boat, were not taken, and I understand that there was no other boat in the neighborhood of the cove from which they could have been taken, and none probably on the island which are not under guard.

In connection with the subject, I would respectfully call the attention of the colonel commanding to the following regulations now existing on the island in regard to the picket-boats passing out at night: The officer of the picket-boat reports at nightfall to the officer of the day of the First Sub-Division before going out, and the latter cautions his sentinels that the picket-boat is going out. So far it would seem that the arrangement was a good one, but the sentinel