War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0476 S. C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. Chapter XLVII.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST MILITARY DISTRICT,

Mount Pleasant, May 6, 1864.

Captain H. W. FEILDEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Charleston:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to inform you that Lieutenant White, engineer in charge, informs me that he could work about 1,000 hands to advantage on Sullivan's Island, furnishing that number with tools, &c. One drawback to the speedy completion of work is the want of transportation, only five wagons being available. I have to request that very spare team may be furnished to Major Vardell, to be applied to this service, and that hands, if possible, be furnished to the extent named above. From twenty-five to fifty wagons could be profitably employed, although I fear it would be useless to expect even the smaller number to be furnished.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CHARLESTON, S. C., May 6, 1864.

Brigadier General WILLIAM B. TALIAFERRO,

Royall's House:

Colonel Harrison telegraphs from Hardeeville that a gun-boat and four transport steamers went to sea this morning. Thinks the transport steamers had troops on board. Have a close watch and see if they slip in anywhere near us. Have telegraphed Gilmer to hurry up the Twelfth Georgia Battalion. News from Virginia this morning encouraging.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

CHARLESTON, S. C., May 6, 1864.

Major General J. F. GILMER,

Savannah, Ga.:

I must have the Twelfth Georgia Battalion as soon as possible. Colonel Harrison telegraph from Hardeeville that a gun-boat and four transport steamers went to sea this morning. Thinks the transports carried troops.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES CONFEDERATE STATES,

Richmond, May 7, 1864.

General SAMUEL COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: I have reflected on this strange order, and while it seems to me it ought not to be allowed to continue in operation any further, conflict or dissension with its author had better be avoided. I propose, then, that you write to General Jones, now commanding