War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0385 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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The 24-pounders smooth-bore at works Nos.2 and 4, Sullivan's Island, it is very desirable to have mounted on siege carriages so that they may be withdrawn from battery and run again into battery as may become desirable; a view concurred in by the chief engineer. Requisition for a number of 24-pounder siege carriages was made long since on the Ordnance Department. They are very much needed in several works where for the want of them we have guns mounted on barbette.

The idea is suggested for the consideration of the commanding general to remove from Sullivan's to James Island the nine 10-inch sea-coast mortars, and so place them in as many separate and as distant batteries as practicable as to cover a field of fire ranging from Black Island, through the Swamp Angel Battery and Wagner, to Battery Gregg.

The deficiency in cartridges within reported should be made up to the quantum of projectiles.

A. J. GONZALES,

Colonel and Chief of Artillery of the Department.

P. S.-The field pieces mentioned within, if not belonging to a field battery, should be put in position in suitable works and in charge of an officer and detachment to use them in a night attack. If not wanted on Sullivan's Island, they should be sent in depot, guns can be of much service.

A. J. GONZALES,

Colonel and Chief of Artillery of the Department.

[Second indorsement.]

HDQRS. DEPT. OF S. CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., April 5, 1864.

This 32-pounder is intended for one of the middle batteries of that island, and is now being put in position. It is certainly desirable this should be done, but only after more important work shall have been executed. Call the attention, however, of the Chief of Ordnance to the necessity of having as many siege carriages for 24-pounders made as practicable.

This is disapproved. The order has been given, on the contrary, to increase the number of mortars on Sullivan's Island from nine to eleven, and to reduce those on James Island from eight to six, concentrating the latter at or about Fort Johnson in order to obtain the fire of those seventeen mortars at as close a range as possible on Morris Island from Cumming's Point to Battery Wagner.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

[Third indorsement.]

CHARLESTON, April 15, 1864.

Since the rendition of this report the greater part of the cartridges from Battery Kinloch has been removed for its better preservation, as recommended, to Battery Gary, leaving only about twenty-seven for an emergency. The charges for the gun at Kinloch, a 32-pounder

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