War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0368 S.C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. Chapter XLVII.

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[Third indorsement.]

APRIL 15, 1864.

Respectfully referred to General Bragg, for his information and consideration.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary.

[Fourth indorsement.]

APRIL 16, 1864.

The enemy's forces appear to me largely overestimated, and our own operations too entirely defensive.

BRAXTON BRAGG.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., March 21, 1864.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Charleston, S. C.:

Private reports from the North represent launches, some twenty-five or forty in number, as preparing to be sent to Charleston for the purpose, as alleged, of a night attack on the city. The launches will hold about 40 men. The report is given without full reliance, but from abundant caution.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS,

No. 8. Savannah, March 21, 1864.

The major-general commanding regrets the necessity which compels him to call the attention of commanding officers to the depredations committed by the soldiers upon private property in the Military District of Georgia and Third Military District of South Carolina. These acts of robbery and theft, while they are in direct violation of all civil and military law and gross outrage upon the rights of patriotic citizens, are beyond measure deleterious to the discipline and efficiency of the army, and must at all hazards be stopped. To this end commanding officers will hereafter hold their immediate subordinates strictly responsible.

District commanders will be accountable to these headquarters. They in turn will look to brigade or sub-district commanders and to all those reporting directly to them. In this manner each superior will hold responsible his immediate inferior until the commanders of companies are reached. These must determine who among their men have offended or be themselves subject to punishment for neglect of duty.

Good officers will take such precautions and secure such discipline as will, in almost every case, prevent depredations by their men. In those instances where bad soldiers transgress these officers will display such activity in discovering and presenting for punishment the guilty parties as must relieve them from the penalties otherwise incurred. Bad officers alone will suffer, as it is intended they should.