War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0365 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS,

In the Field, Camp Milton, East Fla., March 19, 1864.

Brigadier General THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff, Charleston, S. C.:

Send to Virginia cavalry ordered by General Cooper, and make best disposition meanwhile of remaining troops to meet present emergencies. All quiet here; 2,500 men, re-enforcements, reported received by enemy in Jacksonville on 16th of 17th instant.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT, &C.,

Camp Milton, Fla., March 19, 1864.

Brigadier General THOMAS JORDAN,

Charleston, S. C.:

Send two Napoleons and two 12-pounder howitzer for Abell's battery, for which requisition has been made. Send also two 12-pounder howitzers to substitute for one section of Villepigue's battery. Enemy is quiet in our front and at Palatka.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF S. CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., March 19, 1864.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD:

DEAR GENERAL: To-day received dispatch in answer to Longstreet's communication by Lieutenant Goree, and have sent it on as directed, by telegraph.* He has sent another letter, a copy of which I shall send you as well as my answer thereto.

I telegraphed last night the purport of a dispatch from General Cooper stripping this department of three regiments of cavalry and five companies from South Carolina, and one regiment and three companies from Georgia. I recognize Bragg's work in this. I am not wrong.

I saw two of the new Davids tried in the harbor to-day with most satisfactory results. Three are now ready and I am pushing them by going to see them every day. As soon as dark nights set in they shall be put to work.

Hampton is to come here to superintend the movement of the cavalry. If this cavalry does go to Virginia it portends another campaign across the border, but possibly when ready they may be sent to Longstreet.

Brisk fire of enemy to-day into the city. An explosion at the arsenal this morning in the rocket room killed 2 and wounded a number of persons slightly. It might have been very much worse.

An intercepted dispatch from the fleet the other day showed conclusively that Farragut is not in command of the fleet off this harbor.

I have not alluded to your great bereavement, of which the telegraphic wires give us an account, which I fear is true. Words can do nothing to assuage such a sorrow, or fill again for you the "chambers emptied of delight." And I need not assure you how deeply I sympathize with you at such a time.

Sincerely, your friend.

THOMAS JORDAN.

*See Longstreet to Beauregard, March 7, and Beauregard's reply, March 18, Vol. XXXII, Part III, pp.590,649.