War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0338 S. C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. Chapter XLVII.

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but as they give the number of brigades (three) which have arrived since the fight, and the number (two) and names of the general officers, I believe between 4,000 and 5,000 would cover the re-enforcements.

Second. I was informed by negro prisoners captured that they were from New Berne, N. C., and all the ammunition boxes which I saw were marked "New Berne," leaving no doubt in my mind but that part of the force at Ocean Pond was from New Berne.

Third. I am of opinion that the enemy is too strong and too strongly intrenched at this time to be successfully attacked at Jacksonville. He has certainly many more troops than we have. He has for ten days past directed all his energies to fortifying the neck by which that point is approached, and mounting guns, of which material the navy furnishes all that are needed. His gun-boats occupy positions which enfilade the approaches. There is no cover co conceal or protect an advance, and timber felled for abatis would offer serious resistance.

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. B. TALIAFERRO,

Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 7.]

HDQRS. FORCES IN THE FIELD, ARMY OF FLORIDA,

March 6, 1864.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Commanding Department:

GENERAL: I have the honor to state, as the result of the best information, I have been able to obtain from all sources, that the enemy's land forces in and around Jacksonville are not less than 12,000 men of all arms; and the probability is that they exceed this number. This force is supported by not less than four gun-boats. The position of Jacksonville is a very strong one naturally, as indicated by map and by statements of persons familiar with the locality. These advantages, as we are informed and believe, have been strengthened materially by artificial works around and in front of the town. To do this they have employed several thousand negro troops. Against such works, defended by such odds, with the aid of their gun-boats, which command the approach to their works, I am of the opinion that it would not be prudent, with the forces and means at your disposal at this time, to attempt to dislodge him.

I am, very respectfully,

D. B. HARRIS,

Colonel and Chief Engineer of Department.

[Inclosure Numbers 8.]

List of regiments, composing General Seymour's command at battle of Ocean Pond, as represented by prisoners.

Forty-eighth New York.

One Hundred and fifteenth New York.

Forty-seventh New York.

Fifty-eighth New York.

One hundred and twenty-seventh New York.