War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0319 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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ing of the day on which the attempt was made, and the attempt was made before I could reach the fort and communicate the order to the officer in charge. When I placed the prisoners on board the vessels in Light-House Inlet I gave general instructions to the 2 officers in charge to prevent at all hazards the escape of any prisoners, and as both officers had been in charge of the prisoners, and were better acquainted with the prisoners and the best method of securing them than I was, I left the details to those officers, having the utmost confidence in their fidelity and efficiency. They were both fully aware that they were authorized to shoot any one should they in their judgment find it necessary. In this particular instance the 3 men were in the water, and as soon as discovered, the captain says, made no further attempt to escape, and that he considered them completely within his power, and that consequently to secure them it was not necessary to shoot them.

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. P. BROWN, JR.,

Colonel 157th New York Vols., Commanding District.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., October 31, 1864.

Brigadier General JOHN P. HATCH,

Commanding District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla.:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs me to state that he wishes you to allow no more women or children to come within your lines from the rebels if you can possibly avoid it. Those who do get in must not be allowed to leave Florida under any consideration without authority from these headquarters.

The major-general commanding further directs, in consequence of the fact of the Floridians not responding to the call for Florida troops as it was expected they would do, that you discourage as much as possible all males from entering your lines unless they agree at once to take the oath of allegiance and are willing to bear arms. The majority of the refugees in Florida have apparently done us more harm than good.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., October 31, 1864.

Brigadier General JOHN P. HATCH,

Commanding District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla.:

GENERAL: I have just received the report of Lieutenant-Colonel Marple, Thirty-fourth U. S. Colored Troops, of the fight near Bradley's Creek on the 24th instant, which resulted in a defeat, besides the loss of 20 or 30 men and a large number of horses. This late disaster has resulted as I predicted when you established the post at Magnolia against my wish. I have always been opposed to the established of a post at that point, and have repeatedly so stated in letters to you.

In my letter of August 10, I stated that "your plan of operating from Magnolia is not considered so desirable as from Baldwin."