War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0302 S. C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. Chapter XLVII.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., September 24, 1864.

Major General SAMUEL JONES,

Commanding Confederate Forces, Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: In reply to your communication of the 22nd instant in relation to the case of J. M. Burnett, and containing four inclosures pertaining thereto, I have the honor to say that he is not, and has not been, in my custody. You state that he was captured by a raiding party from one of the vessels of the blockading squadron. He may be, therefore, in the custody of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, commanding the squadron, to whom I have accordingly referred your letter with its inclosures.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF FLORIDA,

Jacksonville, Fla., September 25, 1864.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Commanding Department of the South:

GENERAL: I am informed by deserters and also by one of my scouts, that there is at Camp Pinckney, on the Saint Mary's River, 5,000 barrels of resin and 70 barrels of turpentine. This is barreled, and there is in vats 2,000 barrels of soft turpentine. On the north side of the Satillo River, only a few miles from Jefferson, there are three plantation on which there are 500 negroes. If you do not object I propose getting in the resin and turpentine immediately and shall also send a scout through Nassau County to arrest and bring into our lines as prisoners every able-bodied man. By the call of the Governor of Florida, all men capable of bearing arms are in service and should be held as prisoners for exchange whenever taken, although they may not be actually under arms at the time of capture.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. P. HATCH,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, Numbers 139.

Hilton Head, S. C., September 26, 1864.

In honor of some of the brave officers who have served in this department, the most of whom having lost their lives in the present rebellion, the new works lately erected will hereafter be known by the following names:

The works within the intrenchments at Hilton Head will be known as Fort Sherman, after Brigadier General Thomas W. Sherman, U. S. Volunteers, formerly commanding this department.

The work at Mitchelville will be known as Fort Howell, after Brigadier General Joshua B. Howell, formerly colonel of the Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, killed at Petersburg, Va., September 14, 1864.

The work at Beaufort, S. C., will be known as Fort Stevens, after Brigadier General I. I. Stevens, U. S. Volunteers, killed at the battle of Chantilly, Va., September 1, 1862.