War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0277 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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ENGINEER DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 9, 1864.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Commanding Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C.:

GENERAL: Understanding from the chief of staff that you will have no present use for the two bridge trains recently ordered by you for Hilton Head, Mr. Trowbridge has been directed to retain them in New York, subject to the wants of the general service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHARD DELAFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Engineers.

[Indorsement.]

Acknowledge receipt.

J. G. F.

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 9, 1864.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Hdqrs. Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C.:

GENERAL: There is at New York a bridge of ten corrugated iron pontoons, just completed and ordered by General Woodbury for use in a Southern climate. In consequence of the death of General Woodbury and the resulting derangement of his special plans in connection with this bridge, there seems now no necessity for its being sent to Key West. I desire to learn whether you can receive these pontoons and have them tested, as to the comparative advantages of wooden and metallic boats, in the climate in which you are operating.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHARD DELAFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Engineers.

HDQRS. NORTHERN DISTRICT, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

Morris Island, S. C., September 9, 1864.

Captain W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Dept. of the South:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of September 5 with regard to the fire of our gun on Charleston. In reply I have to report that I fully appreciate the importance of the suggestions therein contained and hope that you will call the attention of the major-general commanding to the fact that we have no fuses longer than forty seconds, whole we require forty-three seconds, and when we splice them they do not answer. Thus far I have not found the percussion-shells reliable. There is needed here immediately a large number of 430 second fuses and grease for the projectiles, as I am informed there is none at the post, and it is very bad to fire without lubricating the shell or shot. There is a great deal needed here to make the ordnance department efficient, and as it is our man dependence for present operations, I beg that you will call the commanding general's early attention to the subject.

I am, captain, very respectfully,

R. SAXTON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.